Papagiannakopoulos and Sanchez-Rivera model effects of cancer-linked genes


October 27, 2014

Sequencing the genomes of tumor cells has revealed thousands of genetic mutations linked with cancer. However, sifting through this deluge of information to figure out which of these mutations actually drive cancer growth has proven to be a tedious, time-consuming process. MIT researchers have now developed a new way to model the effects of these genetic mutations in mice. Their approach, based on the genome-editing technique known as CRISPR, is much faster than existing strategies, which require genetically engineering mice that carry the cancerous mutations. Led by Papagiannakopoulos [a postdoc at MIT’s Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research], graduate student Francisco Sanchez-Rivera, the paper’s other lead author, and Koch Institute director Tyler Jacks, the paper’s senior author, the team used CRISPR to accurately reproduce the effects of two well-known lung cancer genes. Continue reading on MIT News.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *